“I want to be able to make people feel better with my words. In an era where feelings are fake or materialistic I want you to dig deep down and pull it all out. I want you to laugh till your tummy hurts, cry like a baby, or just feel completely content with your current situation.”

Check out the interview with Tommy Fresco exclusively on Skilly Magazine Online.

Skilly: Tell us where this all began. What is your history in the music scene?
Tommy Fresco: Like most I always enjoyed music. When I was in high school my best friend and role model Dave started playing bass. So since I was doing everything he was doing at the time I decided to play guitar. From the garage I went on to play in some rock bands doing shows and recording until I moved to New Jersey. It was there I met another best friend, Sincere, who’s influence got me into hip hop.

After that I got into recording and making instrumentals because I got tired of dealing with bands. I was making tons of beats for rappers but I had no rappers to get on them. So I started writing. Then I started doing shows so I could meet rappers. Then I realized I loved being on stage and I was good at it.

What are the best ways to promote yourself as an artist? Any tips you can give us?
Go outside to parties, to shows, and to anything else that involves people and music. Interacting with people and showing them who I am as person has been my biggest gain in support. My advice is to get out there. Show people what you can do in real life, not just behind a camera or recordings.

What do you ultimately want to become in your career?
I want to be leader. I want to be able to make people feel better with my words. In an era where feelings are fake or materialistic I want you to dig deep down and pull it all out. I want you to laugh till your tummy hurts, cry like a baby, or just feel completely content with your current situation. I want you to feel it.

What is the hardest thing about being in the music business?
The business part of it. Like any other kind of artist, I just want to make the art. I don’t want to take pictures, set up plans, and make decisions. All that stuff takes away from my music time. I like to just sit, make beats, write, and perform what I’ve created.

What is it like in your city? What is the music scene like, and how is it like living there overall?
Poughkeepsie, New York. I don’t have a lot of positive things to say so I won’t say much. Not a lot of venues for hip hop. But there are a lot of promoters who take money over talent and book 10+ artists per show so they can make money and pay the venue.

What are some of advice you can give and share to other artists who are still trying to come up?
Firstly, never stop working. If you have a job, write at work. If you don’t have a job, create a product you can sell and then get out and hustle it. Secondly, know your worth. Of course you are the judge of what it really means but without people to back you up, you are just making it for yourself.

What is the best thing that’s ever happened in your career?
I played a pretty big event called Pizzafest. It was all good and fun but the moment I remember most was at the end of my set. I got down off the stage and asked for everyone to move close to me. As the last song started an 11 year girl popped up right in front of me. We introduced ourselves and she stood in front of me and watched me the entire song. And at the end of the song we both broke out in dance.

It felt so good to have an innocent child with the world ahead of her to be so interested in what I was doing. Turns out I have a friend that works at her school, and the next day she was talking about me with her friends like I was a celebrity. Her mother even found me on Facebook and is always supportive of what I am doing. All in a bundle it’s what I do this for.

What is your inspiration?
Love. I can’t think of anything more that I put into this or take from it. That’s the best way I can describe it.

Do you feel anyone can be successful now in today’s world of music?
Depends on what success is to you. If it’s money, yes. If it is something bigger, that’s a different story. I guess in the world of music, my answer is no. I feel that just like anything else you might want to do with life, you have to want it bad and know why you want it. If you don’t know what and why you want something, it’s impossible to figure out how to achieve it.

Where can we find you on social media?
You can find me on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and any other online media sites as Tommy Fresco. Give me some feedback and share with your friends.

iTunes: Tommy Fresco
Spotify: Tommy Fresco
YouTube: Tommy Fresco
Soundcloud: tommy-fresco
Reverbnation: tommyfresco