“The greatest challenge we face today in the music entertainment business as up-coming artists is the barrier. Being able to break past all the people that don’t want to support the movement and pushing into the others that want to see it grow.”

Check out the interview with Rhythm&Rhyme exclusively on Skilly Magazine Online.

Skilly: How were you able to start your journey in the entertainment business? Where did this all start?
Rhythm&Rhyme: As a whole, Robbie and I (D-Ceased & Derrty Shirt), started rapping in the horrorcore genre with one of our tight homies back in 2013 and we decided to take it to another level and created Rhythm&Rhyme in 2015 and have been on our journey since then. We have done a lot of shows since our start in 2013 and we have learned a great deal from our experiences and will continue to grow and love the music we create and perform.

What are some of the creative ways you use to promote your music?
We do both online networking and face to face. We love to get personal with people that just are there for the love of music. We have a good team of close friends and family which helps too, we like to thank all of them for all their help and love. We stay consistent with shows and always promote the next one coming at any performance so people know to look out for us and all the other great local talent because we all put in our work and it’s nice when it gets its recognition.

What is the greatest challenge you face in today’s entertainment business? How do you overcome them?
The greatest challenge we face today in the music entertainment business as up-coming artists is the barrier. Being able to break past all the people that don’t want to support the movement and pushing into the others that want to see it grow. A lot of artists are in it to get paid and we are just in it for the love and passion of the music. The best way to overcome the barrier is to just stick to our reasons why we do what we love to do and learn and experience what we were meant to discover.

How is the music scene like in your hometown? What do you like about it and what don’t you like?
It’s not as pronounced as other areas, but it’s getting there. There are lots of great local talents on the rise here in Boise and we are just starting to draw the spotlights over to our state. We like the fact that the scene isn’t as built here as everywhere else because it gives us a chance to make history along with the other artists.

Because we aren’t like L.A. or down south where there’s a greater opportunity to get heard and noticed, you got people like us trying to grind every day and it’s hard. The only thing bad about the scene in our area is some of the artists’ ego. It puts a chink in the movement of the chain and creates more of a struggle on everyone’s’ success. In the end, we all want to grow but we have to remember to help each other.

Where do you think the future of music is going to be? How do you feel artists can be more a part of it?
It really depends on what you’re asking, but we’ll keep it simple. The radio has turned into bullshit and now the underground music is on the rise. The best way to be a part of it is to show love, to not just the music but get involved yourself. Go out and put your name out and do it.

What advice can you give to other upcoming artists and musicians trying to achieve success?
Put all your heart and soul into it and don’t make it about the money. If you’re only in it for the money you’re going to get nowhere fast. Have fun, don’t make it a job and make it a career.

What inspires you to write your next song?
There’s a few ways we get inspiration for a song we are about to create. Whether it’s just the vibe we catch from the track to the current mood or getting the urge to write; there’s just so many variables.

What are the steps you take to make a song?
We work on the topic and depending on how we are feeling we will either write our verses on what we feel for the verse or we will start with the hook. It just depends. Sometimes one of us will just write a verse and roll off of it, either make a solo or a Rhythm&Rhyme track.

What do you think makes a great song?
Honestly, truth makes a great song. There’s so much fake shit that you hear in today’s music. Lyrics with meaning behind them and a great beat. It’s refreshing to not hear the same old rap song. Who cares what you sound like, you don’t need special effects; just be you and keep it real.

Where can we connect with you? Can you give us your social media links and where we can contact you?
Facebook: TallTreeRecords
Twitter: @rhythmrhyme208
Reverbnation: rhythmrhyme
Soundcloud: rhythm-rhyme-963671460
YouTube: Robbie Menard