“I have found the best way to promote my music is just by hitting the streets and talking to people. The best way I have found to get dedicated fans is to talk with them one on one, it helps to get the fan know you as an artist on a personal level and also helps them relate more to your music.”

Check out the interview with Haze Brown exclusively on Skilly Magazine Online.

Skilly: Tell us where this all began. What is your history in the music scene?
Haze Brown: I’ve always had a major love for music since I was a child, listening to almost every genre out there from pop to classical; yet I didn’t get deep into hip hop until I was 16. I was introduced to hip hop by my fellow lyricist and best friend J-Sweetz who asked me to join him during a freestyle cypher during lunch in school.

Ever since then, rhyming has become second nature to me. I’m just trying to find my true audience with my #ProgressiveStoner style mixed with that nostalgic 90’s era flow.

What are the best ways to promote yourself as an artist? Any tips you can give us?
I have found the best way to promote my music is just by hitting the streets and talking to people. The best way I have found to get dedicated fans is to talk with them one on one, it helps to let the fan know you as an artist on a personal level and also helps them relate more to your music. Don’t forget to also push your music through promotions online. Make sure you get out there and just talk to the people.

What do you ultimately want to become in your career?
I want to become a legend in my own right, through not only my music, but other talents as well like animation and writing. I want to leave my stamp in the game as bringing something unique to hip hop and not just some re-hash.

Hip hop has always been about expressing your thoughts and ideas of what you know and desire. I want to bring that back to the scene. That feeling when a person hears a song that they have somebody who relates to them and lets them know not to give up but to press on. I want to become timeless.

What is the hardest thing about being in the music business?
I think the hardest thing about being in the music business is staying grounded. Once you start getting a name for yourself, some people forget where they come from and get Hollywood on the people who helped most.

Once you destroy your support system, you’re doomed for failure. I feel the artist who stays humble to their core fans and fan base in general succeeds more and are more open to making music that will be truly inspiring instead of commercial nonsense.

What is it like in your city? What is the music scene like, and how is it like living there overall?
The city of Irvington has its fair share of musical talent hidden within but to bring it out is the tricky part. The music scene in Jersey overall is nothing compared to the likes of NYC, but there are a few gems here that I call home.

The Blue Room Lounge in Secaucus is one of the few stages I can say truly throw a great hip hop show. I have performed at The A List Showcase hosted by A $harp, an awesome showcase featuring the best hip hop from Jersey’s own.

What are some of advice you can give and share to other artists who are still trying to come up?
Don’t give up. Whatever happens, good or bad, don’t give up. Take everything as a learning experience and apply it to make your next moves greater. Don’t be afraid to learn from your peers.

A good artist will study what works for one artist and use that as motivation to drive the grind harder. Finally, always stay true to your core. Always remember why you started this in the first place and keep that in focus.

What is the best thing that’s ever happened in your career?
I don’t feel the best thing has happened just yet for my career. I still feel that I have a ways to go before I can say without a doubt what the best thing happening would be. I’m looking forward to being able to look back at my beginnings and see how much I worked to make my life better for myself and others through my music.

What is your inspiration?
My inspiration comes from listening to other creative music from artists, preferably 90’s hip hop. Any type of music that actually has a message to help instead of destroy inspires me to make music of that caliber and higher. I’m inspired by what I didn’t have growing up and what I can achieve now with my music.

I’m also inspired by my team and what we’ve been through growing up in the hood poor and struggling. I always wanted to be able to take care of the people who helped me in my times of need and give people out there who went through what I have hope.

Do you feel anyone can be successful now in today’s world of music?
I feel anybody can be successful in music, but I also feel that not too many people can handle being successful once the fame hits. In this digital era, it’s easy to get your music out to the masses but to sustain the success is the tricky part.

Where can we find you on social media?
Official Website: www.OfficialHazeBrown.com
Twitter @RealHazebrown
Instagram @realhazebrown
Soundcloud: @hazebrown

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