“Find a team to make the dream work. Most people are not going to see your goal, they just see a dream. Once people see you make an effort, the people who you don’t know often will help. I had people I never met in other states help me.”

Check out the interview with DP the Groundhogg exclusively on Skilly Magazine Online.

Skilly: How were you able to start your journey in the entertainment business? Where did this all start?
DP the Groundhogg: I started working on Welcome 2 the Woodz Vol 1 a year ago and released it in October 2015. Back in 2003 I went to a music school called IPR to do music production and ended up working in the IT field. I decided I wanted to make some music I can ride to. I felt we needed some feel good music in Minneapolis. G funk felt like the best music I could bring to the table.

What are some of the creative ways you use to promote your music?
I take it back to the old school out the trunk passing CDs out. I was out of town doing IT work for Cargill months back and told people I do music and sent some CDs to Des Moines. I sent a box of discs to Atlanta, Missouri, Sacramento, and to people I know. CDs isn’t dead and my cover looks nice.

What is the greatest challenge you face in today’s entertainment business? How do you overcome them?
The biggest challenge is getting into venues that support this type of music and getting organic hometown support. Setting myself apart is the challenge and maintaining a good financial situation with home life as well. I have a goal and I am willing to strive to achieve it.

How is the music scene like in your hometown? What do you like about it and what don’t you like?
The music scene is becoming vibrant. Minnesota is starting to get some light, small shards of it but nonetheless light. One thing I don’t like is that we bandwagon a lot. Minnesota people like to support out of towners more than their own. And that’s is our fault for not being more original.

Where do you think the future of music is going to be? How do you feel artists can be more a part of it?
Music is becoming heartless. What I mean by that is it’s all digital and fast food. Gene Simmons made a comment about rap dying and I was offended. But I had to think, if we don’t start incorporating more live and original music, it can die. It will be like what happened to all those old blues guys, their style got whitewashed. Rap can turn corny.

What advice can you give to other upcoming artists and musicians trying to achieve success?
Find a team to make the dream work. Most people are not going to see your goal, they just see a dream. Once people see you make an effort, the people who you don’t know often will help. I had people I never met in other states help me. No prophet is respected in his own land.

What inspires you to write your next song?
The funk. Some deep bass slap and a harsh situation fits the best to make a rhyme. Most of my stories are from situations that actually happened. Here and there a throw some social commentary in. I don’t censor. If I said fuck you I meant it on that record.

What are the steps you take to make a song?
I listen to the beat for a few minutes, turn it off, and write. After 16 bars I work on the next verse. I don’t like riding the beat all the way, life isn’t perfect so my delivery won’t be. It has edge and swing to it, cadence. A few words may be a little off, I’m not a syncopated muthafucka so I change the rhythm sometimes.

What do you think makes a great song?
I think that the music should reflect the person who makes it. Be honest. If you never sold one pinch of dope I think you suck if you rap about it. Great song or not. You are a fraud, you may not be able to do a show because your fans know you are a fucktard.

Where can we connect with you? Can you give us your social media links and where we can contact you?
Facebook: www.facebook.com/groundhoggseason
Soundcloud: www.soundcloud.com/dp-the-groundhogg
Twitter: @dpthegroundhogg
Instagram: @dpthegroundhogg