“I think the hardest part about the music industry is timing, patience, and perception of one’s art. Being who you are may not be enough to get you noticed while at the same time your motivation might be to break that mold. If that’s the case then, patience will be a constant in an artist’s journey.”

Check out the interview with Jaye exclusively on Skilly Magazine Online.

SKILLY: Tell us where this all began. What is your history in the music scene?
JAYE: My music journey began at a young age listening to all kinds of music. From the music my parents would play to music videos I was attracted to, all had a part in igniting the need to create my own music. From a toy guitar at 4 to a mixer at 17, I’ve always had a steady passion for creating. I’ve performed on stages and at frat houses opening for other artists such as Chevy Woods and also performed at showcases around the southeast. I’ve also performed with other local artists at local art shows promoting musical and creative progress in our city.

What are the best ways to promote yourself as an artist? Any tips you can give us?
Generally, the best way to promote yourself is an investment in the right places. You have to be observant and timely as well. Spending time and resources in the wrong direction can set you back further than where you started. It also takes a tremendous effort on the artist to put themselves out there far enough for someone to see the potential in you to help guide you in a way that makes people really pay attention to you. I say take as many chances as you can whether that be business cards, Instagram posts, radio interviews anything that could work, but trust your gut at the end of the day.

What do you ultimately want to become in your career?
I ultimately want to have a steady career in the music business. In all aspects. Writing, producing, networking, performing, bottom line contributing to an industry that can provide a platform for artists to express themselves however they see fit. That’s something I’m proud to have the opportunity to be a part of.

What is the hardest thing about being in the music business?
I think the hardest part about the music industry is timing, patience, and perception of one’s art. Being who you are may not be enough to get you noticed while at the same time your motivation might be to break that mold. If that’s the case then, patience will be a constant in an artist’s journey. Trying to balance the creative process while “playing the game” can also be difficult. No one really sits down and lays it all out for you so you have to find your lane and try to stand out in it.

What is it like in your city? What is the music scene like, and how is it like living there overall?
I’m from an up and coming city (Birmingham, AL)when it comes to true nationwide exposure. Every year comes with a step up in investment, notoriety, and opportunity in the city’s music space. All kinds of music are welcome here. From R&B to rap to country to folk music, every genre has its own niche community to gravitate towards. Artists support each other’s venues, causes, and businesses frequently all to build a music culture that can support itself.

What are some of the advice you can give and share with other artists who are still trying to come up?
I’m still an up and coming artist myself so I’m still learning a lot but as far as advice I say stick to whatever makes you happy. People love seeing people do the thing and go after what they’re passionate about.

What is the best thing that’s ever happened in your career?
I’d say my best accomplishment has been performing for artists such as Chevy Woods and TwoN9ne and having the opportunity to learn things from them to incorporate into what in doing. Being able to actually see what I visualized for so long was a proud moment for me.

What is your inspiration?
My inspiration is my desire to do something here that’s never been done before. Working every day to separate myself and what we’re doing from the rest is what drives me. Watching and following worldwide renowned artists inspire me as well. Watching others go through some of the same things trying to make it provides even more motivation in itself to keep going even when it feels like things are going nowhere.

Do you feel anyone can be successful now in today’s world of music?
Of course, anyone can make it in this industry. Different styles and sounds attract different ears and demographics every day. If people like you..you’ll sell. If people see you staying true to what you believe in and you promote it to the fullest I believe anything is possible.

Where can we find you on social media?:
Radio: http://www.coolhyperadio.com/new-music-jaye-for-the-low/
SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/jaye205