“Since it’s SXSW season at the moment I’m thinking after a well thought out project, a few videos, aggressive marketing, and more live experience this time next year I’ll be ready to go to Texas to perform at as many shows as possible. I refuse to go there to just be a spectator.”

Check out the interview with 40 $tacks exclusively on Skilly Magazine Online.

Skilly: Where did this all start? Tell us about your journey in the entertainment business.
40 $tacks: I dropped my first official mixtape T.G.I.F. (Thank God Its Forty) on Datpiff when I was 16 years old. Although I was born in Massachusetts, I grew up in Kissimmee, FL. I moved back to New England in ’09 and the mixtape was my state of mind at the time. I cringe now, but for the zero promotion I put into it the project it took off on its own. With such little resources put in it was a good feeling, but it also reminded me early on to not fuck around and take this shit serious. So here I am 5 years later and a total brand overhaul. New flows, new look, new money. Don’t sleep.

What would be your biggest piece of advice for the young kids out there trying to do what you do?
First off, I’m going to ask these kids to ask themselves seriously if this is really what they want to do with their entire life. Everybody raps, but can you make an actual song? Since home studios have gotten inexpensive anybody can record and post a song. That’s cool, but the ones who are actually serious will put the money up, make sacrifices, and more importantly never quit.

What are some of the hardest challenges and tasks in your position?
The hardest challenge for me is balancing real life, being creative, and managing the actual business aspect of the music. During my hiatus I took the time to study how marketing works and networked hard but in the process my buzz lost steam due to inconsistency. G-Eazy said it best, “The mind of a perfectionist is always in pain.” The only person in the way of my success is myself.

We all know the entertainment business is very tough, but what do you find is the best way to promote and advertise your music?
In my opinion the best way to promote is to come up with innovative plans to get the fans to feel more involved in your success. Host giveaways with special prizes to keep your core fans engaged, show love at shows, and make sure each move you make is a power move. I can’t say this enough, if you’re humble a lot of opportunities can fall onto your lap not only because of your degree of talent but your down-to-earth personality as well.

Tell us about your city. How are the artists and the fans?
I hail from a densely populated city in central Massachusetts named Leominster. It’s smooth, its quiet but the elements of hip hop have always been rooted in our culture. If you work hard, word of mouth can travel fast and you can build a buzz even faster. My team and I are looking to inspire other artists to network, get press, be confident, and most importantly be professional with their approach if they choose to represent the city.

Where do you see yourself a year from today?
Since it’s SXSW season at the moment I’m thinking after a well thought out project, a few videos, aggressive marketing, and more live experience this time next year I’ll be ready to go to Texas to perform at as many shows as possible. I refuse to go there to just be a spectator. No matter if I’m on the bottom of the ticket, I’m going to make some fans regardless and make the best of it.

Who and what were your biggest inspirations? Who do you look up to in today’s world?
Musically my inspirations are Bone Thugs-n-Harmony, Outkast, G-Unit, Three 6 Mafia, and Crime Mob as I got older. Though my biggest inspiration I can reach out to has to be my mentor DJ E-Dubble who I view as the gate keeper of New England’s hip hop scene. Since he’s been on the radio more and more, the air in our music scene has changed for the better and he has brought excitement to a culture that once seemed lost.

How do you feel about the music coming out today? Do you like it?
Aside from hip hop being over saturated, the better music that’s coming out today to me is innovative. You have to admit since the 90’s producers have evolved drastically, beats sound like movie scores now. God bless the producer for real and artists like Kevin Gates, Young Thug, and Future for pushing the envelope with their voices and creating harmonies that complement each instrument. The future is bright for hip hop.

Where can we contact you and find you online?
Official Website: www.massartistry.com
Facebook: TeamNASA
Soundcloud: Stacks-laroux
Twitter: @bobgnarley978
Instagram: @bobgnarley978
Booking: biz4stacks@gmail.com