“It’s not the hours you work, it’s the work you put in in the hours you work. It’s not going to happen overnight, most of the time it take years to blow up. Just continue to be consistent with your work ethic and in the long run you will see changes for the better in your music career.”

Check out the interview with Young Lye exclusively on Skilly Magazine Online.

Skilly: How were you able to start your journey in the entertainment business? Where did this all start?
Young Lye: My sister Shari who went to be with the Lord at a young age because of a car accident started teaching me how to rap at the early age of 3 years old and my dad saw that I liked it and was learning fast.

He got my two brothers and I to make a rap group named 3 Angels and after a while my two brothers dropped out of the group. I kept at it by myself first calling myself Lil Lion, then Young Lion, and now Young Lye 14 years later.

It all started for me in The Bronx, New York City, where rap started.

What are some of the creative ways you use to promote your music?
I promote my music projects a lot on social media like Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Linkedin, Instagram, and my official website. I also go to a lot of night clubs and hit the street corners giving out flyers. I make lots of CDs of my tracks too and give them out at the clubs and on street corners. I also promote by doing a lot of stage shows/performances.

What is the greatest challenge you face in today’s entertainment business? How do you overcome them?
The greatest challenge I face is meeting reliable people who you can trust to do the work you hire them to do. They all say they can do this and get you this and that, but after they get paid you either don’t hear from them or they can’t do the job they said they can do.

How I overcome? Over the years, my dad who is also my manager, Jimmy Clarke, and I learned to do the jobs ourselves and don’t have to be depending on anyone.

How is the music scene like in your hometown? What do you like about it and what don’t you like?
The music scene is live in my hometown of NYC. What I like about it is that if your music is hot, people are going to be playing it and singing to it in the clubs.

What I don’t like about it is they don’t play upcoming artists’ tracks on the radio that much. I would really like to hear more future stars’ tracks get played because these young artists in NYC have the potential but they just can’t get the opportunity to show their talent.

Where do you think the future of music is going to be? How do you feel artists can be more a part of it?
I think the future of music is getting bigger and greater every day because that’s one language every human being can understand and they love to rock to music. It frees their soul from stress and depression.

I feel that artists should keep on writing and producing good music. There are people out there that will think that your tracks were made just for them and the artist will gain life time fans and supporters.

Keep writing and making hot music. You will never know which one of your tracks new fans and supporters will love and buy because it reminds them of what they’ve been through in life.

What advice can you give to other upcoming artists and musicians trying to achieve success?
It’s not the hours you work, it’s the work you put into the hours you work. It’s not going to happen overnight, most of the time it take years to blow up. Just continue to be consistent with your work ethic and in the long run you will see changes for the better in your music career.

People always say to me, “I see you’ve been grinding for years now and you haven’t stopped. I’m glad to see that. Many artists I knew that started when you started aren’t in the game anymore.”

What inspires you to write your next song?
Whenever I hear a hot beat I just know I got to spit some fire. At times, life experiences of people around me and myself lead me to writing my next tracks.

What are the steps you take to make a song?
I go through my music beats catalog first to see if I hear a beat that I like, whether it’s an old or new beat. I also check out YouTube and Soundcloud to see if I hear any fire beats. Most of the time I make up a hook first, after the hook the verses come flowing through. Those are the steps I take to write and produce my tracks.

What do you think makes a great song?
I think a great track comes from your heart, some say to make it sound like you’re telling a story. Others say don’t put too much bling-bling and money in your track because there’s too much of that already.

I really think the artists should put down on paper what he or she is feeling deep down in their heart and soul. Write what that beat is telling you to write. If the next man doesn’t like it, it doesn’t matter as long as you’re loving it.

Where can we connect with you? Can you give us your social media links and where we can contact you?
Official Website: www.younglye.com
Facebook: @younglye
Soundcloud: @young-lye
Twitter: @younglye
Instagram: @younglye
YouTube: @younglye
Email: Stacklargeent@gmail.com

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