“Now the Bay Area music scene is diverse with artists from Philthy Rich to G-Eazy. I like the fact that every artist from the Bay isn’t doing the same thing but still is open for collaborating with each other.”

Check out the interview with UPSCALE exclusively on Skilly Magazine Online.

Skilly: How were you able to start your journey in the entertainment business? Where did this all start?
UPSCALE: I’ve always been a fan of hip hop music. When I was 15 I started filling notebooks with my own rhymes. By the time I was 18 I entered the Bay Area independent rap scene. I eventually saved up enough cash to create my own studio which is where I produced and recorded my albums.

What are some of the creative ways you use to promote your music?
In the early days of my career I used the same formula as E-40 and Master P to promote my music which was out the trunk of my car. One year we drove to Los Angeles for the NBA All Star Weekend with a trunk full of CDs. I found out that my album was featured in Showcase Magazine “All Star Edition” which is an independent Bay Area hip hop magazine.

I used this as a selling point and sold every single CD we had. Although times have changed, I still use the same formula but have expanded upon it with the digital age. Social media is a huge platform to promote myself. I make sure that my content is consistent and that I’m engaging with my fans and keeping them up to date with everything.

What is the greatest challenge you face in today’s entertainment business? How do you overcome them?
In today’s entertainment business there are so many artists that seem like duplicates. My greatest challenge that I face is creating music that I want to make versus creating music that’s popular right now. However, I remain true to myself and create what I feel and those records are timeless versus trendy.

How is the music scene like in your hometown? What do you like about it and what don’t you like?
The Bay Area music scene to me has always been ahead of its time. In the beginning of my career there was hyphy music which was a homegrown cultural phenomenon. My style was more lyrical and smooth, but I did have the opportunity to work with a lot of hyphy artists. Now the Bay Area music scene is diverse with artists from Philthy Rich to G-Eazy. I like the fact that every artist from the Bay isn’t doing the same thing but still is open for collaborating with each other.

Where do you think the future of music is going to be? How do you feel artists can be more a part of it?
I think the future of music is going to have fusion genres. For example, Drake is a hip hop/r&b artist. There are a lot of artists that have followed his approach. I feel artists can be more a part of it by breaking the rules and taking risks. Don’t be afraid to try something new or of people’s opinions. Stay true to yourself and to your music.

What advice can you give to other upcoming artists and musicians trying to achieve success?
The best advice I can give to other upcoming artists and musicians trying to achieve success is to never stop believing in yourself and perfecting your craft. I’ve heard tons of no’s, but I’ve also heard tons of yes’s. You have to have tough skin and perseverance especially in the rap game. It’s also important to learn new tricks and continually develop yourself as an artist or musician.

What inspires you to write your next song?
My lifestyle inspires me to write my next song. Whether I’m on vacation or handling business I’m constantly formulating lyrics based on my day-to-day experiences.

What are the steps you take to make a song?
I have tons of beats on my laptop that I go through. When I find one I’m feeling, I start with the hook and then with the verses. From there I lay down the song in the studio and then I’ll listen a couple of times before making edits. Sometimes my engineer will gives me ideas and I’ll add them into the record. I’ll listen to the record for a couple of weeks to make sure everything is perfect and then I’ll have it mixed and mastered.

What do you think makes a great song?
I think lyrics and flow makes a great song. Lyrical content is the main ingredient in hip hop music. Flow is just as important because if you don’t have it, you can have the best lyrics but be boring to listen to.

Where can we connect with you? Can you give us your social media links and where we can contact you?
Official Website: www.upscalemuzik.com
Soundcloud: @upscalemuzik
YouTube: @papermademuzik
Facebook: @upscalemuzik
Twitter: @thekiddupscale
Instagram: @thekiddupscale
Email: management@upscalemuzik.com

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