“The hardest part is treating the art like a business. The two don’t mesh, it’s a very meticulous juggling act. One must be ever cautious not to stumble into one’s own feelings on the clock.”

Check out the interview with Real Chop Clark exclusively on Skilly Magazine Online.

Skilly: Where did this all start? Tell us about your journey in the entertainment business.
Real Chop Clark:
My mother was a career administrative office worker and my pops was a professional musician. It’s a myth that I was conceived in a studio. My dad was my hero, and I wanted to be just like him. He played the keyboard and I took to the saxophone. Then I decided that jazz was dying and nobody wanted to hear music without words anymore, so I learned how to rap and they say the life you live for is the life that chooses you.

What would be your biggest piece of advice for the young kids out there trying to do what you do?
Don’t quit.

What are some of the hardest challenges and tasks in your position?
The hardest part is treating the art like a business. The two don’t mesh, it’s a very meticulous juggling act. One must be ever cautious not to stumble into one’s own feelings on the clock.

We all know the entertainment business is very tough, but what do you find is the best way to promote and advertise your music?
Connect with the fans. The work must be done, dues must be paid, and time must be put in.

Tell us about your city. How are the artists and the fans?
Denver has a lot of overlooked talent with a lack of consistent opportunity and even less community support. I feel like in order to make it out of Denver you have to know everybody, become liked by the majority, and you have to go somewhere else, blow up there and big up the town.

Where do you see yourself a year from today?
My eventual goal would be to create a business with enough consistent capital flow to go public. When you purchase my product you are making an investment in quality music that invests back into community resources. So a year from now I’d like to be well on my way to that goal.

Who and what were your biggest inspirations? Who do you look up to in today’s world?
Today? Businesswise? Dr. Dre, Jay Z, Tech N9ne. Musicwise? Nipsey Hussle, Curren$y, Nas, and Kendrick Lamar to name a few. Off the charts? Barack Obama and Spike Lee. Shout out to Ava DuVernay, my mom for raising 4 kids no breaks, my baby brother Andre Grey for surviving the system.

How do you feel about the music coming out today? Do you like it?
I feel there’s a lot of creative energy in the game right now. Some of it is misguided, a lot of it has potential, and some of it’s phenomenal.

Where can we contact you and find you online?
My new single “Black Roses” drops on over 125 vendors and platforms across the world on November 1st so be sure to check it out.

Soundcloud: www.soundcloud.com/realchopclark

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