“Know that you stepped on a road many choose to not dare walk down, so you’re of a special breed of individuals that took on your birthright to create art. Once it feels like “eh, I’m going to quit because I’m not making the money I expected to make,” then you’re in it for the wrong reasons. You may want to step back from it. The money will come as a result of your passion…”

Check out the interview with Path P exclusively on Skilly Magazine Online.

SKILLY: How were you able to start your journey in the entertainment business? Where did this all start?
Path P: It started officially with my long time friend Thre3. We were playing around with some music on a music program he had on his computer while a mutual friend and I visited him at his house. What he had pulled together brought on an urge in me to write, which I had expressed to him (I had began writing back in high school, at the influence of my other close friend, Ganz, but had never really picked it back up after he left for the army after high school). At that point, Thre3 threw a pad at me and said “Ok. write!” Haha, and so I did. Then our boy Kalala, he free styled some crooning lyrics for a verse and a chorus. 12 hours later, we recorded our first song ever, which led to other songs. 6 months down the line, I performed at SOB’s for Faces in the Crowd and got the 3rd place spot, which was major for me. From there, it was fire. I started networking more, attending every open mic and event I could in the city, learning from my peers, and I put out my first project 12:49AM: The Mixtape.

Where do you think the future of music is going to be? How do you feel artists can be more a part of it?
I feel it’s going to continue to evolve. I feel like as of lately the mainstream has been in real bad shape as far as quality of music and talent, but there are some artists out now or on the come up that are revolutionizing and reinvigorating the culture. The music and all things considered in that realm, I feel a willingness to be more authentic, more creatively charged and empowered, as well as empowering. Taking on a connected spirit, relative to the masses and the everyday pitfalls and rises rather than talking directly about the money or whatever other frivolous concerns will have more great music churned out. I feel we’re on the verge of that. I’m not seeing it sounding the same as the past, and that’s OK, because growth and evolution is important.

What are some of the creative ways you use to promote your music?
I use all the standard social networks (Facebook, Instagram, Soundcloud, Twitter, YouTube) to post regularly about my music, whether it’s posting about a show, sharing performance videos, conferring with other artists in Facebook groups, or whatever else may go along with that. I like to connect with people and get their feedback in person and at shows before I get on stage. I believe in the power of the tangible element of interaction with supporters.

What is the greatest challenge you face in today’s entertainment business? How do you overcome them?
The greatest challenge I’d say is adequate visibility in the right markets, specifically as an independent artist. So the grind gets much deeper, there tends to be less sleep, more research and constantly being in the places and spaces necessary to get the music heard. For me specifically, I’m clear I have a product not of the norm that the industry is currently pushing. But my goal is reaching the people worldwide with a sound and message I feel they deserve to hear and would appreciate. To garner that result, it’s going to take lots of work on the ground, on the internet and an adamant spirit dedicated to doing the homework while creating. I stand with confidence in my work up to now, based on the feedback of true listeners of the genre and specifically of my music over the years. I don’t need anymore evidence that I’m dope at what I do and that it’s something that connects with people on a deeper level than just bobbing their heads. I’m just not on everyone’s TV sets and in their cars or speaking at their schools… Yet.

What advice can you give to other upcoming artists and musicians trying to achieve success?
Stay true to your art. Stay authentic with what you’re creating. Stay hungry for it. I’ve found within that frame of mind, it doesn’t feel like a chore. It doesn’t feel like a burden. Your art should never be a burden. If you get frustrated and keep going, then it’s worth it. Know that you stepped on a road many choose to not dare walk down, so you’re of a special breed of individuals that took on your birthright to create art. Once it feels like “eh, I’m going to quit because I’m not making the money I expected to make,” then you’re in it for the wrong reasons. You may want to step back from it. The money will come as a result of your passion.

What do you think makes a great song?
Having a real connection to the content and being passionate about one’s craft is what makes it great. For rap, it definitely helps if the artist wrote the lyrics. I’m clear, this isn’t always the case with even the top artists, but a capability to connect with the content and deliver it as intended can produce great results. I’m not crazy about it, but I don’t have to do it, and I don’t do it. All my music has a personal connection to me because I write it from the heart. So, heartfelt music, not meaning sappy or mushy or anything, but true to the heart and what the artist believes in, usually makes for the greatest songs, in my eyes.

Where can we connect with you? Can you give us your social media links and where we can contact you?
You can connect with me on Facebook, (facebook.com/pathpmusic) on twitter and Instagram, (@PATHPMusic) and via email at pathpmusic@gmail.com. Thanks Skilly!

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