“There’s a lot of times when people want to categorize me as a hardcore female … I continue to show improvement in my music and push myself to get the job done or get my point across to show I will not be dominated or degraded.”

Check out the interview with Monesha Jones exclusively on Skilly Magazine Online.

Skilly: How were you able to start your journey in the entertainment business? Where did this all start?
Monesha Jones:
Music started for me as poetry. I would express anger to my mom in a rhyme and leave it out in the open so that she may see it. I wrote down what was real from the start. My struggle my laughter, my curiosity all turned into lyrics with melody and meaning.

What are some of the creative ways you use to promote your music?
I’m into illustration and sketching so a lot of times I capture myself as a character or a movement of importance from history. On Aphrodite Returns EP there’s an image of myself almost being baptized out of the water expressing nudity as pure and confident. I use art to express my music.

What is the greatest challenge you face in today’s entertainment business? How do you overcome them?
People in the industry trying to get over on me because I’m a female. There’s a lot of times when people want to categorize me as a hardcore female rapper because I come from a rough area. I continue to show improvement in my music and push myself to get the job done or get my point across to show I will not be dominated or degraded.

How is the music scene like in your hometown? What do you like about it and what don’t you like?
Connecticut’s just not a music state. No one’s coming to my state looking for artists to sign, they come here to make money off of us. We have to do better and I noticed a change around 2014 when we started to support each other. I believe that’s making a big difference. I also believe we are creating a new sound.

Where do you think the future of music is going to be? How do you feel artists can be more a part of it?
The future of music is in the youth. I’m sorry, but only old-school cats want to hear 90’s rap come back. Lyrics are making their way back into hip hop I believe. We need more uplifting music and a message in our craft that’s not harmful to our community.

What advice can you give to other upcoming artists and musicians trying to achieve success?
Build your worth, write your own music, learn how to mix and master, and learn to make beats. Learn as much as you can about the music business. Create your own sound. Spend money on what’s necessary. Don’t spend money on something that sounds too good to be true. You should recognize a scam, this industry is shady.

What inspires you to write your next song?
My environment, whatever’s going on around me. Sometimes you have to think beyond the situation that you’re in and write about a premonition, something that you already see for yourself. That’s what I do. I like to write what’s real.

What are the steps you take to make a song?
Your song is like your diary to the world. The first thing I focus on is the hook, sometimes the hook comes natural when the beat calls to me. Then I think about how I can catch your attention with the first few words that I say. Then I think about ending the song hard. It’s best to write the whole song in a day for me.

What do you think makes a great song?
Great lyrics and melody. Sometimes the hooks makes a good song. I think the best songs are songs to get you in a mood or out of the mood. A song that sticks in your head, a catchy song in my opinion is a great song. Also inspirational songs are the best songs ever because they last a lifetime.

Where can we connect with you? Can you give us your social media links and where we can contact you?
Official website: www.mobudda.com | www.biggboymanagement.com
Soundcloud: www.soundcloud.com/mojones87
Facebook: MoBudda
Twitter: @Mo_budda
Instagram: @Ms_Butterworth
Snapchat: @Wrmobudda





Click ‘Next' to see the next part…→