“Please keep in mind that the pioneers that came before us experienced and went through hardship, blood, sweat, and tears just so we can even be able to be a part of the art that is hip hop culture.”

Check out the interview with Max Star exclusively on Skilly Magazine Online.

Skilly: Where did this all start? Tell us about your journey in the entertainment business.
Max Star: I believe I was born with the gift of lyricism, but if I were to pin point the exact time I fell in love with hip hop I would have to say it was the age of 13. It wasn’t until I was age 18 that I decided to become a full time rapper and make a career out of this gift I was blessed with.

I was originally involved in a rap duo which after 2 years fell apart and I became a solo artist in 2004 changing my rap name from Max Pain to Max Star. It was a catchy name I have to say, so I ran with it. My journey has been a very extreme one since that inception.

What would be your biggest piece of advice for the young kids out there trying to do what you do?
Do it for the love, passion, and the art of hip hop. Not for the ratchet bitches, money, and fame. Please keep in mind that the pioneers that came before us experienced and went through hardship, blood, sweat, and tears just so we can be able to be a part of the art that is hip hop culture.

What are some of the hardest challenges and tasks in your position?
Being taken seriously. Because of the inception of the internet and social media, everybody is allowed to post and promote any ol’ thing. If you are a shitty rapper or artist, you can market it yourself and even if you are talented and genuine. The masses become extremely numb and desensitized to the things you post online because everybody is doing it as well. I feel like it becomes a battle to spread good music these days.

We all know the entertainment business is very tough, but what do you find is the best way to promote and advertise your music?
Social media obviously. Even more importantly, if you stay true to the music and true to yourself the truth will come to the light because real recognizes real.

Tell us about your city. How are the artists and the fans?
I’m originally from New York, the birth of hip hop; Queens is the borough I was born in. I now reside in Los Angeles where the fans are haters and supporters as well. It’s a diverse group of fans.

Everybody wants to be a rapper but haven’t paid their dues. It’s hard to shine above the rest. You just have to stay true to yourself and put out the best product you can for your city to rock with.

Where do you see yourself a year from today?
Hopefully touring, recording, doing major shows, and festivals. I mainly pray that my internet fan base has grown as well. I’m trying to slang this crack music.

Who and what were your biggest inspirations? Who do you look up to in today’s world?
Back in the day I grew up on the likes of Biggie, Pac, Eminem, Redman, and Ludacris. Nowadays … there aren’t too many who inspire me. I’m a big J. Cole, Kendrick Lamar, King Los, and Cyhi Da Prynce fan.

How do you feel about the music coming out today? Do you like it?
Not all of it. I appreciate some trap/snap music, but I can’t relate or bump all of it; it gets a little out of hand in my opinion. Hip hop is very subjective these days, so to each his own. I tend to stick to the music/hip hop that’s full of substance.

Where can we contact you and find you online?
Facebook: @MaxStar83
Instagram: @TheRealMaxStar
Twitter: @OfficialMaxStar

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