“Today’s music has a lot of mixed messages and because music is a universal language and very influential we must be mindful of the type of music we put out. I listen to today’s music and enjoy most of it and I understand the game of music. I choose to be held accountable for the type of influence I deliver to the listeners.”

Check out the interview with M16 & The Full Moon Wolves exclusively on Skilly Magazine Online.

Skilly: Where did this all start? Tell us about your journey in the entertainment business.
M16 & The Full Moon Wolves: Music was an inheritance for me. My father played guitar traveling the world playing for the greats. My mother was a singer, heavy in the church, and all of my siblings inherited the bug and are musically inclined.

I was classically trained on the piano at an early age and as I got a little older I gravitated toward hip hop; hearing Twista and Gang Starr gave me the spark.

My mentor/manager/artist developer had the foresight and made the decision to infuse my hip hop with the music that was influential to me growing up. He combined hip hop, jazz, rock, and funk to create my sound: hip hop infused with rock that’s a little jazzy carrying a funk undertone.

What would be your biggest piece of advice for the young kids out there trying to do what you do?
My mentor always told me: “Reality is a dream desired and pursued. You get out what you put in.”

I want them to understand that everything around us started as an idea and a dream. Believe and trust in yourself, live by this mantra young world: “Be a dream chaser. Remain yourself when making a decision. Be different. That’s what you are (different), which alone is a gift.”

What are some of the hardest challenges and tasks in your position?
One of the hardest challenges for me was finding out that the people I was surrounded by and doing music with did not believe in the direction of my music and never supported the new sound we were creating.

I was not a typical hip hop artist and the fact that I had a rock influenced sound, it was not well received in the hip hop circle I was working with.

We all know the entertainment business is very tough, but what do you find is the best way to promote and advertise your music?
As I stated previously, I am not the typical hip hop artist. My mentor/manager Panama Red understood this because he was a critical part of creating my sound. We promote/advertise in an abstract way as well as traditional methods.

We promote and do the things a pop, rock, country artist would do. We perform in rock, hip hop, and pop clubs. We appeal to those patrons as our demographic/target audience frequent all of these places

Tell us about your city. How are the artists and the fans?
My city is rich in talent and business. It is known as the Bull City/The City of Medicine/The Birth Place of Cigarettes as well as the place where the first black Wall Street existed. The famous Hayti Area was where all the music stars came to party and perform, from James Brown to Marvin Gaye.

There are numerous indie artists and artist who have signed major deals in the industry. The artists in my city have various styles and sounds and the same thing applies when it comes to the fans. They’re loyal to who they like, but we are creating something with our movement where the fans of other artists and the artists themselves are huge fans of M16 & The Full Moon Wolves.

Where do you see yourself a year from today?
Overseas on tour performing in front of 30,000 people and my songs hitting high on the charts with constant radio rotation. A few endorsement deals, movie placements, commercials and gaming system placements. Performing for my high school fans across the country as we perform for all the high schools in every town and every state we visit or set up for the Never Forget To Dream and Believe Tour for our high school fans.

Who and what were your biggest inspirations? Who do you look up to in today’s world?
My sound is influenced and inspired by different artists such as Lenny Kravitz, DMX, Twista, Busta Rhymes, Black Eyed Peas, Limp Bizket, and Kid Rock. Early on in my career Panama Red gave me the moniker “The Rap Lenny Kravitz” and we developed my sound based off my influences and personality. The hip hop with a funk undertone is what you hear in the music. I’m still inspired by these artists today.

How do you feel about the music coming out today? Do you like it?
Today’s music has a lot of mixed messages and because music is a universal language and very influential we must be mindful of the type of music we put out. I listen to today’s music and enjoy most of it and I understand the game of music. I choose to be held accountable for the type of influence I deliver to the listeners.

Where can we contact you and find you online?
All Social Media: @M16rebellion

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