“I breakdown advertising into two areas, internet advertising and street advertising. Both are effective and needed to go to the next level. People are more likely to buy my album when I ask them in person than asking them on the internet, but the internet is the best way to get more fans and has a larger outreach.”

Check out the interview with M-See exclusively on Skilly Magazine Online.

Skilly: Where did this all start? Tell us about your journey in the entertainment business.
M-See: Ever since I can remember I always had a love for rhyming. I can remember getting on my siblings nerves because I wouldn’t stop rapping around the house about anything I saw. By the time I reached high school my friends and I started a group called Cinco (for 05, the year we would graduate). In College we renamed the group into M.A.D.E. Ent (Money All Day EveryDay) which consisted of my lifelong friends P-Air Live (Marcus West), J-Purk (Justin Perkins), and later on we added my cousin Deshawn Brown.

I attended Alabama A&M University and released my first album Fresh Off Pluto. It was great album, but it opened my eyes into how much work it would really take to make into this music industry. After graduation I moved back home and realized my second album Malcom X because my name is Malcom and want speak on real issues in society. Last Thanksgiving I released my third album, Soul Food, Music For The Soul, and I have been promoting that till this day. Soul Food is music that makes you feel good. Everybody needs a plate of that.

What would be your biggest piece of advice for the young kids out there trying to do what you do?
Keep God first. Get an education. Do be afraid to be yourself even if that makes your different. Don’t think you can rap about certain things, look a certain way, or live a certain lifestyle to express yourself through music. The world is yours.

What are some of the hardest challenges and tasks in your position?
My hardest task is to get my music beyond my area because I know I make music for the world. Alabama is not an open music market. Most artists don’t make it from here. The last artists that did make it was killed in is home city (Doe B). Our state has a way of not respecting its local artists and a lot artists don’t support each other. I’m determined to show that I’m a diamond in the rough waiting on my time to shine.

We all know the entertainment business is very tough, but what do you find is the best way to promote and advertise your music?
I breakdown advertising into two areas, internet advertising and street advertising. Both are effective and needed to go to the next level. People are more likely to buy my album when I ask them in person than asking them on the internet, but the internet is the best way to get more fans and has a larger outreach. I purchased a billboard in my city and it was effective, but I have learned that the internet is the best way to reach new fans.

Tell us about your city. How are the artists and the fans?
I’m from the civil rights mecca Selma, AL. My city opened the world to the injustices of discrimination throughout the south. Oprah made the movie Selma the year before last that showed how our pain affected the world. Now Selma is a place with 50% of the youth in poverty and crime at an all-time high because of the poverty.

When I moved back to Selma from college I noticed these things immediately. Every artist in Selma is unique, there is a lot of talent here. You have to work to gain the fans’ respect but once you do they will support you. There’s only around 17,000-20,000 people in the city.

Where do you see yourself a year from today?
Doing what I’m doing now, hopefully on a bigger platform. I will always follow my passion to influence people in a positive manner through music.

Who and what were your biggest inspirations? Who do you look up to in today’s world?
As a kid growing up in Alabama I was one the few kids that listened to Jay-Z growing up. He had a big influence on me. In my late teens and early twenties I was a Lil Wayne fan, he impacted me as an artist also. Now Drake and J. Cole are my favorites.

How do you feel about the music coming out today? Do you like it?
I feel there is a void in the music game for real music. Music has become watered down, there isn’t much substance out there today. There’s a few artists making real music, but for the most part I’m not a fan of most artists.

Where can we contact you and find you online?
Official Website: www.musicmade4soul.com
Facebook: M-See
Instagram: @its_mceo
Twitter: @ITS_MCEO
Email: 27msee@gmail.com

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