“I’m not concerned about the pitfalls. They’re the same with any business. For some reason people like to highlight the music business, but all business operates in the same way. There’s more corruption and back stabbing in the offices than there is in the streets. That’s real talk. You know what you need to do to survive. Stay true, focused, and on your mission.”

Check out the interview with Jaye B exclusively on Skilly Magazine Online.

Skilly: How were you able to start your journey in the entertainment business? Where did this all start?
Jaye B: In an era where a multitude of artists struggle to define their musical image from the maelstrom, there are others that emerge with a fully formed musical identity in full command of their craft. I certainly am regarded to be among the latter description.

I was born and raised in the northwest of England maturing in London. I’m a self-taught musician with no formal education who spends my spare time experimenting to hone my skills and my exclusive sound. I’m an unsigned lyricist, singer/songwriter, bassist, and poet with an extensive catalog of unreleased material. Recently I’ve teamed up with The Fantasy Music to work on several projects, notably the upcoming album Points of Truth.

What are some of the creative ways you use to promote your music?
We have been proactive in our approach resulting in music played on radio, podcasts, videos, TV, websites. Then there’s interviews, giveaways, mixtapes, shows, open mics, social media, a feature or two. I’m keeping to myself. All is not to be told after all. Lets just say you have to believe in yourself, work hard, aim, and practice

What is the greatest challenge you face in today’s entertainment business? How do you overcome them?
I just do music and let the people decide what they want to hear. I’m not concerned about the pitfalls. They’re the same with any business. For some reason people like to highlight the music business, but all business operates in the same way. There’s more corruption and back stabbing in the offices than there is in the streets. That’s real talk. You know what you need to do to survive. Stay true, focused, and on your mission.

How is the music scene like in your hometown? What do you like about it and what don’t you like?
Being from London the music scene is globally renowned for its quality and variety. You can hear what you want when you want. People are very receptive to music and support what they like.

Where do you think the future of music is going to be? How do you feel artists can be more a part of it?
It’s a very interesting time with the capabilities we have with technology to produce, communicate, share information and projects. It’s all about what you intend to achieve. For me it’s all about the process, that’s the greatest pleasure.

The fact most things are obtainable with the right budget and blueprint now means it’s an open market. If you’re savvy in your approach you can create opportunities for yourself and others. Artists have more opportunity to be heard, market, and even distribute now with the internet.

What advice can you give to other upcoming artists and musicians trying to achieve success?
Know what you want and don’t stop striving for what you desire. Success comes in many forms. When you know what success means to you then you know what needs to been done to achieve it. I thrive off the creative process to conceive an idea and create it.

What inspires you to write your next song?
To put it simply, life is the main inspiration because so much inspires me to write and compose; it all depends on what your objectives are. More often than not, I get an idea then build from there. No restrictions. Generally it’s as simple as a thought that I run with to subsequently capture the moment.

What are the steps you take to make a song?
It can happen many ways. I don’t have a particular routine that I follow. I tend to let it flow. It could be the concept, then the beat, or it could be a bass line or drum pattern then again could be a hook melody and so on. It’s all about the vibe. I trust my instincts and go with what feels right. Try not to force anything.

What do you think makes a great song?
There’s so many different elements that combine to make great songs. For me it’s the message, how it’s conveyed, and the sonic journey. How it moves from beginning to end. A great song is able to capture the hearts and minds of the listener, has impact, and transcends any boundaries. Just real raw emotion is what makes it for me.

I want to be transported to that space the artist was or created and I can feel it. Then I can say it’s a great song.

Where can we connect with you? Can you give us your social media links and where we can contact you?
Official Website: www.crookebeats.co.uk
Twitter: @Crookebeats
Instagram: @crookebeats
Facebook: @artistjayeb
Facebook: @thefantasymusic
Facebook: @pointsoftruth
Soundcloud: @jamie-belgrave
YouTube: @Crookebeats

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