“So, to me, the best way to promote your music is to make music worth listening to. Care about the craft. If people like you’re material, they’ll play it. You don’t have to throw it in someone’s face or force it down their throat.”

Check out the interview with Jay Gudda exclusively on Skilly Magazine Online.

Skilly: Where did this all start? Tell us about your journey in the entertainment business.
Jay Gudda: My journey started long before I can remember. My strongest childhood memories revolve around music, but I didn’t recognize the significance of that until sometime in high school. I can remember listening to Nirvana when I was sitting in a booster seat in the back of my mom’s car. My first dream I can remember was about music. One of the first things I remember buying with my own money was Nelly’s Country Grammar album. I never turned back from hip hop since.

Starting in middle school I wrote songs or verses nearly every day. That was at school, at home, on the bus, everywhere. I didn’t actually record or realize that I could make something of it until high school. Thankfully I did and the rest is history.

What would be your biggest piece of advice for the young kids out there trying to do what you do?
My advice is to be yourself. I think this is probably the most common answer from successful artists as well. The point is that every person is unique in their own way, whether they actually realize that or not. It’s okay be influenced but don’t copy. I think originality and honesty are two main ingredients to creating something special.

What are some of the hardest challenges and tasks in your position?
I’m aware that my challenges and tasks are only going to get harder as I progress in my career. I don’t really dwell on what’s difficult right now because the road ahead is a long one. Almost everything’s difficult when you’re chasing a dream.

We all know the entertainment business is very tough, but what do you find is the best way to promote and advertise your music?
Promoting and advertising are some of my least favorite aspects of this industry. I’m obsessed with music. The product. What you’re actually listening to in your car or in your headphones. So, to me, the best way to promote your music is to make music worth listening to. Care about the craft. If people like you’re material, they’ll play it. You don’t have to throw it in someone’s face or force it down their throat. If they love it, they’ll show their friends. If they genuinely enjoy what you do, then that’s the kind of fan you want.

Tell us about your city. How are the artists and the fans?
I think New England is a region waiting to blossom. There are countless amounts of independent artists. It’s only a waiting game to see who comes out of that pack on top. It’ll be exciting.

Where do you see yourself a year from today?
I’d like to be on tour in a year. I don’t care about the size of the tour just yet. I’ll have a brand new project out by then and I want to see firsthand how people from other regions take to my material.

Who and what were your biggest inspirations? Who do you look up to in today’s world?
My inspirations are all over the place. I love when this question comes up, but I never know the best way to answer it. In the hip hop world I’m inspired by Eminem, Lil Wayne, Biggie, and Jay-Z. Of course I’m also inspired by Nirvana, KISS, The Beatles, and all the other groups that I listened to when I was young. I still listen to them today.

The issue with this question is that inspiration can come from practically anything, not just music and artists. So, to keep this short and sweet: my life is my inspiration.

How do you feel about the music coming out today? Do you like it?
That’s a general question. So in general, I hate it.

Where can we contact you and find you online?
Official Website: www.whoisjaygudda.com
Twitter: @WhoIsJayGudda
YouTube: whoisjayguddavideos
Email: whoisjaygudda@gmail.com

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