“I’m a firm believer that you should give something for people to elevate to instead of dumbing down lyrics. I want people to be able to listen to a track and catch something new or have a feeling resonate.”

Check out the interview with Jai Carey exclusively on Skilly Magazine Online.

Skilly: Where did this all start? Tell us about your journey in the entertainment business.
Jai Carey:
At 12 I started writing and by the age of 13 I was being published in poetry books. Around that time I really started experimenting with the writing process for raps which ended up sticking. By 15 I was in a group and started working on freestyling off the top trying to hone my skills and improve. At 16 I did my first performance at a local club called Snaps and Taps to an audience of 1 person at an open mic. From there I was hooked.

What would be your biggest piece of advice for the young kids out there trying to do what you do?
Educate yourself on both the business and artistic aspects of what you do. A lot of people that are pursuing a career in music only focus on one side of the business and then the other side suffers. There has to be a balance if you’re going to take it seriously.

What are some of the hardest challenges and tasks in your position?
The biggest challenge right now is that the market is flooded with a lot of music that doesn’t have substance. I’m a firm believer that you should give something for people to elevate to instead of dumbing down lyrics. I want people to be able to listen to a track and catch something new or have a feeling resonate.

We all know the entertainment business is very tough, but what do you find is the best way to promote and advertise your music?
To me the best way to promote and advertise is to get out there. Nothing leaves a bigger impression on potential fans than actually talking with those potential fans. It’s one thing for a person to hear your music at a show, but it’s something special when you can see an artist then engage with them.

Tell us about your city. How are the artists and the fans?
Columbus right now is a city of artists, there’s not too many fans that aren’t doing music themselves. Local support isn’t the greatest. I’m sure people have their own views about why that is, but ultimately when it comes down to it support is not a big thing outside of the artists’ community.

Where do you see yourself a year from today?
I see myself doing more touring throughout the United States and ultimately overseas. My goal is not to be a signed artist, but to work as an independent and create sustainable income to be able to do music full time. I’m also working on getting in the colleges to conduct workshops based around the art and craft of writing rhymes and public speaking.

Who and what were your biggest inspirations? Who do you look up to in today’s world?
My biggest inspirations as far as people go would have to be my mother and deceased grandfather. Outside of that it really depends because I find inspiration in everything. My mind is always working so if I see it, it’s a potential punch line or metaphor or concept.

How do you feel about the music coming out today? Do you like it?
I’m not going to say that I don’t feel it, but there’s definitely a mood I have to be in to listen to it. There was a quote I believe 9th Wonder shared, “Club music is good, there is an over saturation of that. Who is making music for the other 21 hours of the day?” I’m paraphrasing, but ultimately that is how I feel with a lot of music today.

Where can we contact you and find you online?
Official website: www.jaicarey.bandcamp.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/officialjaicarey
Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaicarey
Instagram: www.instagram.com/jaicarey





Click ‘Next' to see the next part…→