“I think the music scene in my hometown has a lot of potential, but people are only as good as their work ethic. I really like the ideas that a couple people have, but the main problem (and main thing I don’t like) is there aren’t many people in the area that take music as serious as me and the people involved with Spotlight.”

Check out the interview with J-Bird exclusively on Skilly Magazine Online.

Skilly: How were you able to start your journey in the entertainment business? Where did this all start?
J-Bird: I started taking music seriously at a young age and it’s been my dream for a while. Between the ages of 11 – 14 I wrote raps as a hobby and would battle rap other rappers my age. When I turned 15 and got into high school, everyone that was in my school district got a school issued Apple laptop and it didn’t take long to start messing around with the app Garage Band. From there I’ve been working on my own personal brand and my entertainment distribution company Spotlight MVMNT.

What are some of the creative ways you use to promote your music?
Being both an aspiring rapper and CEO, I have to think of more than one way to promote what I’m all about. Luckily they go hand-in-hand and complement each other very nicely. Social media is a huge marketing tool and I avidly use Twitter and Instagram.

At Spotlight we have our own clothing line so we sell a lot of merchandise which basically promotes itself. I’m also very focused on performing live shows and have a few live shows under my belt. At every venue we make sure to personally interact with any and all current/potential fans.

What is the greatest challenge you face in today’s entertainment business? How do you overcome them?
I believe the biggest challenge in the entertainment business is validity. Unfortunately people tend to write-off people/things that aren’t already mainstream established. Although it is tough to get people to take aspiring talents seriously, I believe the music speaks for itself. If your product is good it’ll be talked about.

How is the music scene like in your hometown? What do you like about it and what don’t you like?
I think the music scene in my hometown has a lot of potential, but people are only as good as their work ethic. I really like the ideas that a couple people have, but the main problem (and main thing I don’t like) is there aren’t many people in the area that take music as serious as me and the people involved with Spotlight.

Where do you think the future of music is going to be? How do you feel artists can be more a part of it?
I believe that music has an extremely bright future. Musicians are becoming more and more personal and relate to the fans which provides a prime opportunity to reach the fan.

I’ve always seen music as a tool to escape reality and honestly just make life easier and the future of music can really change society and the way people treat each other. Music is the key to making this world better for every person and I’ve always felt like that.

What advice can you give to other upcoming artists and musicians trying to achieve success?
My biggest piece of advice to aspiring musicians is to never give up. Although it sounds cliché, personal growth, success, and happiness all comes from within. If you ever start to doubt yourself or ever start to think that you can’t achieve your dreams you’re bound to fail. It’s kind of like the old saying, “no one can love you if you don’t love yourself.”

What inspires you to write your next song?
I use personal experiences as one of my main inspirations to write music. Music is my own personal way to vent the stresses of my life and I believe that’s a good thing because it makes it genuine and you know nothing I ever say is a lie. Inspiring my fans to chase their dreams also inspires me. One thing I love in life is seeing other people do well and I take great honor in seeing my music effect people in a positive way.

What are the steps you take to make a song?
I always find the beat first and from there I develop the concept of the song that comes from personal experiences and whatever is going on in my life or society. After getting a solid grasp of what I want to address, I write the song and when the song is done I take it to the studio.

What do you think makes a great song?
I think there are a few crucial elements to a great song. One thing required from a great song is having the listener relate to it. If people can connect to the song it gives them a reason to keep listening. I also believe a song needs to be genuine to be great. A song also always needs to have at least one catchy part to get stuck in people’s heads.

Where can we connect with you? Can you give us your social media links and where we can contact you?
Reverbnation: www.reverbnation.com/therealjbird
Datpiff: www.datpiff.com/profile/JbirdHaley
Facebook: www.facebook.com/JbirdMVMNT
Twitter: @The_Real_J_Bird
Instagram: @The_Real_J_Bird

Leave a Reply